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Bidding After a Raise

How to continue when partner raises your suit

After a Major-Suit Raise

West
1 D
2 S
East
1 S
 ? 

Determine the partnership point range
Add Declarer Points (see Point Count) if applicable then add your revalued point count to the minimum 1 and maximum shown by partner.
If the total is sure to be
19-25 pointspass
26-32 pointsbid 4 of your majorS
If the total might be
26+ pointsbid 3 of your major 2I
33+ pointssee Slam Bidding

1 If partner’s range includes 5 or more possible values it is practical to estimate his minimum as one greater than the absolute worst. For example, if partner raises your 1 H opening to 2 H he shows 6, 7, 8, 9 or 10 points; figure his minimum as 7 points unless you are a real pessimist.

2 If the bidding is already at or beyond 3 of your major, then take a chance and bid 4 (or pass if already in 4).

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After a Minor-Suit Raise

West
1 H
3 C
East
2 C
 ? 

Is a major-suit fit possible?
Minor suits are a low priority, so consider the possibility of finding a major-suit contract. If you next bid a major suit that was previously bid, it is natural; and if this raises partner’s suit, he should continue as above after a major-suit raise, almost as if your minor suit were not raised.

If you are satisfied to play in your raised minor suit or notrump, follow the next table.

After a Minor-Suit Raise (no major-suit fit possible)

West
1 C
2 D
East
1 D
 ? 

Determine the partnership point range
Add Declarer Points if your hand is unbalanced then add your revalued point count to the minimum 1 and maximum shown by partner.
If balanced and the total is sure to be
19-25 pointspass
26-32 pointsbid 3 NT 3N
…the total might be
26+ pointsbid 2 NT 4I
33+ pointssee Slam Bidding
If unbalanced and the total is sure to be
19-28 pointspass
29-32 pointsbid 5 of your minor 5S
…the total might be
29+ pointsbid 3 of your minor 6I
33+ pointssee Slam Bidding

3 With two low cards in an unbid suit, prefer to bid another unbid suit below 3 NT. This shows a stopper in the suit bid, then partner may be able to bid 3 NT with a stopper in the unbid suit.

4 If the bidding is beyond 2 NT, then take a chance and bid 3 NT or follow Note 3 above.

5 If your shortest suit was bid by partner, you may bid 3 NT with the unbid suits stopped; or you may bid a suit below 3 NT to show a stopper in case partner can bid 3 NT.

6 If the bidding is already at 3 of your minor, then bid 4; if the bidding is at 4 then bid 5. In other words, if there is a chance for game, do not pass below game.

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© 2013 Richard Pavlicek